2020 Southern Nevada Diversity Summit

Summit Date: October 2, 2020

Hosted by CSN logo

 

Hosted Virtually Via Microsoft Teams Events

Sponsored by MGM Resorts MGM Resorts Logo  and Complete College America Complete College America Logo

 
 

The NSHE (Nevada System of Higher Education) 2020 Southern Nevada Diversity Summit is designed to provide timely and valuable information about the current and emerging challenges and successes in achieving diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts within the United States, Nevada, and NSHE. The morning will focus on national topics. The afternoon will focus on local topics. The theme this fall is “Knowledge to Action”. Our goal is to call people to action during the Summit to make changes in our daily thoughts and behaviors that affect our area of influence and beyond. The speakers and workshops will inform, question, and challenge the status quo, allow for introspection, and make positive decisions about diversity, equity, and inclusion personally, professionally, and institutionally moving forward.

Please make sure to check back here frequently for much more information about the Diversity Summit as the date draws near.

 

Agenda

The agenda for the day is below. The goal is to focus on national conversations in the morning portion of the Summit and the Nevada conversations in the afternoon portion. 

Friday, October 2, 2020

7:40 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
Check-In Online

8:00 a.m. – 8:10 a.m.
Welcome by CSN President, Dr. Federico Zaragoza

8:10 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
Introduction of Benjamin Jealous by MGM Resorts

8:20 a.m. – 9:20 a.m.
A Moderated Dialogue: Brothers, Unlimted - Benjamin Jealous, MSc

9:25 a.m. – 10:35 a.m.
Equality for "All" Open Forum - moderated by Dr. Derric Carter 

9:25 a.m. – 9:35 a.m.

Introduction of Dr. Sara Goldrick - Rab by Complete College America

9:35 a.m. – 10:35 a.m.

How to Equitably Address Student Needs/Student Services to Close the Gap on College Success - Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab

10:45 a.m. – Noon
Simultaneous Workshops

  • Academic Advising from a Social Justice Perspective to include DACA/Undocumented Students
  • Acting on Our Knowledge: Addressing issues of mental health
  • Best Practices for LGBT+ Inclusion in the Classroom
  • Bystander Intervention: A model for understanding identity-based violence and prosocial feedback
  • Experiential Learning on Campus: Identifying ableism
  • Mentoring Virtually: Sharing academic knowledge actively becoming culturally responsive educators

Noon – 1:00 p.m.
Break for Lunch on Your Own

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
2nd Featured Speaker – NevadaFocus – Black at Work: The Struggle is Real!
Tiffany Young, MEd, Director of Equity and Diversity, Washoe County School District,
& KaPreace Young, MA, CFLE, Coordinator, Student Engagement Outreach, UNR

2:05 p.m. – 3:20 p.m. 
Simultaneous Workshops

  • Cultural Humility in the Curriculum: Using self-reflection to fill the gap
  • Exploring “Servingness” in Dual Designated AANAPISIs and HSIs in Southern Nevada
  • Inclusive Accessibility: Designing a campus-wide accessibility program through inclusive planning
  • The Tail of Two Robes
  • There's Not A Place For Me: Supporting NSHE's forgotten population of African American male students
  • Will We Ever Be Heard?

3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Southern Nevada President’s Panel – Future of DEI at NSHE

4:45 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 
Closing Remarks by NSHE Chancellor, Dr. Melody Rose

*Schedule is subject to change.

Featured Speakers

Featured National Speakers

Benjamin Todd Jealous is a civil rights leader, tech investor, and educator. He is also a former investigative journalist and Rhodes Scholar. Ben has dedicated his life to bringing people together, building diverse coalitions for change, and holding government leaders accountable to the needs of everyday people. In 2018, Ben was the Democratic Nominee for Governor of Maryland. He won an overwhelming victory in the primary. The former president and CEO of the NAACP, Benjamin served as the youngest president in its history. During Jealous’ tenure, the NAACP became the largest door-to-door voter registration operation nationwide. Ben has also served as the president of the Rosenberg Foundation, founding director of Amnesty International’s U.S. Human Rights Program, Executive Director of National Newspaper Publishers Association, the largest trade association of African American owned newspapers, an editor of Mississippi’s Jackson Advocate newspaper, and a NAACP community organizer in Mississippi. After a half-decade at Kapor Capital, Ben co-founded a Baltimore-based investment firm, 20X. There he focuses on social impact investing and advising.

Benjamin Jealous, MSC

 

 

Benjamin Jealous, MSC, Civil and Human Rights Activist, Former NAACP President.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sara Goldrick-Rab, Ph.D. is Founding Director of the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice and Professor of Sociology and Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia. She is also the Chief Strategy Officer for Emergency Aid at Edquity, a student financial success and emergency aid company, and founded Believe in Students, a nonprofit distributing emergency aid. Sara is best known for her innovative research on food and housing insecurity in higher education, having led the five largest national studies on the subject, and for her work on making public higher education free.

Sara Goldrick-Rab, Ph.D

 

 

Sara Goldrick-Rab, Ph.D, Founding Director of the Hope Center for College, Temple University in Philadelphia.

 

 

 

 


Featured Nevada State Speakers  Black at Work: The struggle is real!

A generational exploration with the mirrored impacts of the mental and physical weight from racial microaggressions. A professional black mother/daughter duo will share insights and facilitate a courageous dialogue about navigating white spaces.

Tiffany Young, MEd, Director of Equity and Diversity, Washoe County School District.

 

 

Tiffany Young, MEd, Director of Equity and Diversity, Washoe County School District.

 

 

 

Ms. Young is a mother of two beautiful children, KaPreace (24, UNR Graduate) and Anthony (UNR, Sophomore). She is an advocate for families, community, young women, and education. Ms. Young is currently working for the Washoe County School District (WCSD)  as the Director of Equity and Diversity. Ms. Young holds an M. ED and B.A. from the University of Nevada Reno where she is also an Adjunct Professor in the Human Development and Family Studies Department. Ms. Young has been a Commissioner for the Nevada Equal Rights (NERC) Commission since January 2006 and was awarded the Education Service Award by the African American Clergy Council of Northern Nevada.

 

KaPreace Young, MA, CFLE, Coordinator, Student Engagement Outreach, UNR.

 

 

KaPreace Young, MA, CFLE, Coordinator, Student Engagement Outreach, UNR. 

 

 

KaPreace Young is a Reno native the mother of a 6 year old son, Zaccai. She is currently the Outreach Coordinator for the Center for Student Engagement at the University of Nevada, Reno, where she is also a two-time Black alumnae, the co-creator of the Black Leadership Committee and Black at the Pack Affinity Group. KaPreace is also dedicated to her community being the President of the Northern Nevada Black Cultural Awareness Society (NNBCAS) and the Co-FOunder of Shades of Queening Women's Empowerment Group.

 

 

Program Workshops

*Workshops are subject to change, as much notice as possible will be given, check back for updates.*

Morning Workshops


Academic Advising from a Social Justice Perspective to include DACA/Undocumented Students – Esmeralda Carretero Rodriguez

This presentation will be in a workshop-style format. We will begin by establishing community norms to help create a safe space for challenging conversations. An “ice breaker” activity will follow to help define terms and engage in a community discussion about the various intersections of an undocumented student. The goal is to help unpack our own biases and perceptions as it relates to immigration and citizenship. The activity will ask participants to share out and discuss how such intersect. The presenter will include visual representations via a PowerPoint to help drive the conversation further. We will end with a brief closing activity that will include tangible “next-steps” by giving participants a prompt. A survey will be sent for feedback opportunities.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand how to equitably define DACA (Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals) in practical terms as it is currently standing both in legal and social definitions;
  • Address the implications and intersections of what it means to be an undocumented student; and
  • Define ways in which advisors can utilize their role as an advocate to serve the needs of all students, to include DACA/Undocumented students.

Target Audience

  • Advisors, Counselors, Success Coaches, Faculty

Acting on Our Knowledge: Addressing issues of mental healthRoberta Kaufman, Lori Navarrete, Doug Landaverde, and Katie Dockweiler

More than ever, young people are experiencing a tension between freedom and fear. COVID-19, the October 1 shooting, deportation, or threats of deportation in the Valley and nation are just some examples of traumatic events that have significantly impacted the daily life of individuals. Such major, historic events coupled with toxic stress can be deterrents to success if not addressed. The presenters will share data related to the barriers and concerns professionals and the students they work with are encountering. Using a case study approach, participants will not only explore connections between mental health, specialized educational needs and academic success, but also identify solutions that can support student transitions across venues. Participants will exit with an action plan to implement on their specific campuses or within their organization.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify mental health challenges students face as they navigate educational systems before and during the college years;
  • Discuss the connection between mental health, specialized educational needs, and academic success;
  • Analyze concerns and barriers exposed following traumatic events in the community, especially as they impact diverse populations; and
  • Evaluate the current status of professional need.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community

Best Practices for LGBT+ Inclusion in the ClassroomAdam Burgess

Recent studies of LGBT students in K-12 schools have indicated that LGBT students are overwhelmingly underserved, which often means they do not seek higher education. For those who do, we as NSHE faculty and staff want to ensure that our LGBT students know they are welcome and include in the NSHE community. This workshop will provide basic definitions of LGBT terminology, best practices for an inclusive classroom, and information about supporting students' gender identities through correct pronoun and name usage. Elements of the online classroom have been included to help us serve the needs of our students in this current time.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn common LGBT terminology;
  • Learn ways to incorporate LGBT-related readings and content into courses;
  • Learn about ways to include gender-diverse students; and
  • Learn about campus and community resources.

Target Audience

  • Faculty

Bystander Intervention: A model for understanding identity-based violence and prosocial feedback - Angela Moore

This workshop explores the concepts and strategies under-girding Bystander Intervention Programs: How they apply to not only sexual violence but also other kinds of identity-bases violence (racism, homophobia, etc.) and how they speak to debates on free speech.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn the major concepts and strategies of Bystander Intervention Programs;
  • Learn how Bystander Intervention strategies can help combat sexual violence and other kinds of identity-based violence; and
  • Practice Bystander Intervention skills.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community

Experiential Learning on Campus: Identifying ableismDañelle Sundell and Jill McLeod

Through interactive and experiential exercises, we will provide session attendees with first-hand experiences meant to represent some of the everyday challenges facing some students with disabilities on college campuses. Exercises include navigating the classroom and building environment from a wheelchair, completing a homework assignment with important graph data that is all one color to represent issues faced by students with colorblindness, taking notes in class with restricted use of their dominant hand or impaired audio, and taking a test designed to represent a generic view of dyslexia. After the exercises we will gather for a group discussion about each exercise and ask participants for their personal feedback and views of identifying ableism and barriers on college campuses. We will end with a proactive discussion on how each attendee can act as an agent of change in identifying stereotypes and ableism facing NSHE students with disabilities.

Learning Objectives

  • Better understand perspectives and issues facing students with disabilities;
  • Better identify systemic issues of ableism around college campuses; and
  • Enable empathy and outside-the-box of themselves thinking in attendees, in regard to students with disabilities.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community  

Mentoring Virtually: Sharing academic knowledge actively becoming culturally responsive educatorsRosemary Q. Flores, Dulce Monroy, Rogelio Christopher Petras, Izamar Reyna, Nestor Robles-Bermudez, and Ruben Serna

The Mentoring Virtually: Sharing Academic Knowledge Actively Becoming Culturally Responsive Educators session will include an explanation of how a Future Educators Day conference lead by Cultivando Mentes college mentors quickly became a Virtual Future Educators Day to reach over 200 Teaching and Training students at 10 CTE high schools. Five (5) Cultivando Mentes mentors created and recorded lesson plans from their own base of knowledge to reach out to 9th and 10th grade students encouraging them to increase their academic knowledge and learn how to navigate a system to better prepare them for college, especially in the fields of education. The Cultivando Mentes mentors will share how they researched their topic material, and how the culturally responsive pedagogy “pláticas” (conversations) helped them prepare their presentations keeping in mind their diverse student audience. A hands-on activity will demonstrate how the virtual presentations can become interactive.

Learning Objectives

  • Receive tips on facilitating a team of college students to develop their own presentations to reach high school students using culturally relevant information;
  • Identify and use existing virtual platforms to launch students’ presentations to an audience of diverse students; and
  • Access a list of culturally responsive materials which can be used as resources.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community

Afternoon Workshops


Cultural Humility in the Curriculum: Using self-reflection to fill the gap - Ruby L. Nugent, Mayra Corn, & Xan Goodman

This interactive workshop is aimed toward secondary and higher education educators who are interested in exploring the concept of cultural humility and how they can add it to their curricular practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in a classroom environment. The workshop will consist of activities whereby the facilitators will lead participants in reflective writing exercises based on current practices and techniques used in their instruction, followed by an engagement activity encouraging discussion to explore how cultural humility content might impact the student communities they serve in NSHE Higher Education and secondary education. By providing participants the opportunity to self-reflect on their practice as educators, this workshop will activate their awareness of cultural humility as a potent way to uplift learners and to improve DEI in the classroom across multiple disciplines.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the difference between cultural humility and cultural competence;
  • Describe historical precedent, stories that impact historically marginalized communities served in NSHE educational settings; and
  • Conduct a self-assessment of a class or an activity they do in their current classroom practices in a reflective writing activity in order to determine how cultural humility and cultural competence might be used in their classroom in the future (reflect on their practice).

Target Audience

  • Faculty

Exploring “Servingness” in Dual Designated AANAPISIs and HSIs in Southern Nevada - Kristine Jan Espinoza and Luis Ortega

College of Southern Nevada (CSN), Nevada State College (NSC), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) all hold dual designations as both Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs) and Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). This interactive presentation will explore what AANAPISI and HSI means beyond the enrollment qualifications described by the US Department of Education. Sharing institutional demographic data, research literature, and engaging in group discussions, attendees will gain a better understanding of what it means to be “serving” Asian American and Pacific Islander and Latinx students.

Learning Objectives

  • Further knowledge around federal Minority-Serving Institutions designations in Southern Nevada, namely AANAPISIs and HSIs;
  • Introduce research literature on AANAPISIs and HSIs on what it means for institutions to be “serving” beyond the enrollment qualifications; and
  • Engage in group discussions about what initiatives their campus(es) are currently working on and/or how their campus(es) can improve to be more “serving”.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community

Inclusive Accessibility: Designing a campus-wide accessibility program through inclusive planning - Emily King, Sam Bachert, Terry Norris, and Paula Michniewicz

Accessibility is often thought of as something you have to do to accommodate a few people, but it doesn’t have to be. Approached correctly, creating accessible digital content and services can be something that enriches the student and staff experience for everyone. In Spring of 2019, CSN brought together a group of people from across CSN’s campus that had been thinking about how to incorporate the concepts of universal design for learning to create a campus-wide culture of digital accessibility. This session will discuss the process CSN has gone through so far and what steps we will be taking in the future to support digital contents and services that are accessible to all.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe universal design for learning and how they can apply the concepts to their situation;
  • Identify stakeholders that should be included in developing a campus-wide digital accessibility plan; and
  • Identify the steps needed to develop and implement a campus-wide accessibility plan.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community

The Tail of Two Robes - Julie A. Hogan

This presentation challenges stereotypes, assumptions, and discrimination while advancing the idea of "cultural humility". This approach to cultural understanding values diversity and challenges. This will include a presentation on microaggressions and racism/discrimination that occurs on campus when women wear the traditional Islam burka and hijab.

Learning Objectives

  • To observe the concepts of discrimination, microaggressions, bias, and hatred while wearing traditional Islamic robes and veil;
  • To explore the paradigm of cultural humility;
  • To critique the concept of cultural competence as a white entitled approach to cultural understanding; and
  • To witness the stereotypes, assumptions and actions American's embody when seeing the same person in multiple robes and business clothing.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community

There's Not a Place for Me: Supporting NSHE's forgotten population of African American male students - Brian Akins

At alarming rates, NSHE Institutions are experiencing a decline in enrollment, retention, and completion of African American Male students. When compared to other student populations, we are one of the lowest. It should be no surprise that in co-curricular activities, African American Male participation in leadership positions is low. This solution-oriented workshop takes an in depth look at how our institutions are directly supporting this population and is guided by the practices in the book Supporting Men of Color in the Community College: A Guidebook by Frank Harris, and J. Luke Wood.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand that for the success of the African American Male student population, a targeted and directed approach is needed;
  • Present ideas and best practices to directly support this population; and
  • Understand that it is our responsibility to improve the success of this population.

Target Audience

  • Students, Faculty, Staff, Community

Will We Ever Be Heard? - Kari Emm, Staci Emm, and Brenda Freeman

In the state of Nevada, American Indian students are continuously decreasing at post-secondary institutions which equates to less than 1%  of the student population. A feasibility study done in 2015, identifies the greatest barriers for American Indian students within the state. The session will allow attendees to conceptualize cultural identity and how it has created fear in many tribal communities. This has caused many tribal communities and students to be less supportive of higher education. Through the study and the presentation, Tribal Communities and students will finally be given the opportunity to voice their concerns with higher education. Moreover, it will allow attendees to become knowledgeable about American Indian students at their institutions and/or learn more about the barriers that contribute to low enrollment of this specific population.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the barriers of American Indian students in the State of Nevada;
  • How to recruit and retain American Indian students; and
  • How to assist American Indian students to overcome fear of attending a post-secondary institution.

Target Audience

  • Institutional Leadership, Advisors, Counselors, Admissions

President’s Panel Discussion on Future of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at NSHE

Dr. Federico Zaragoza, College of Southern Nevada, Dr. Kumud Acharya, Desert Research Institute, President Bart Patterson, Nevada State College, Dr. Keith E. Whitfield, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Each of the Southern NSHE Institution Presidents will participate in a panel discussion and take questions. An individual is being sought to moderate this discussion and the Q & A.

 

Session Recordings


Live Events


A Moderated Dialogue:
Brothers, Unlimited With
Benjamin Jealous
Runtime: 1:47:40
 

Equality for "All" Open Forum
moderator: Dr. Derric Carter
Runtime: 1:27:07

 

How to Equitably Address Student
Needs Student Services to Close the
Gap on College Success With
Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab
Runtime: 1:20:34

Black at Work:
The Struggle is Real! With
Tiffany & Kapreace Young
Runtime: 1:00:21
 

Southern Nevada President’s Panel
Future of DEI at NSHE
Runtime: 1:54:14

 


Morning Workshops


Academic Advising from a Social Justice
Perspective to include
DACA/Undocumented Students
Runtime: 1:24:41

Acting on Our Knowledge:
Addressing issues of mental health
Runtime: 1:17:07
 

Best Practices for LGBT+ Inclusion
in the Classroom
Runtime: 1:05:08
 

Bystander Intervention: A model
for understanding identity-based
violence and prosocial feedback
Runtime: 1:00:49

Experiential Learning on Campus:
Identifying ableism
Runtime: 1:21:12
 

Mentoring Virtually:
Sharing academic knowledge actively
becoming culturally responsive educators
Runtime: 1:01:37


Afternoon Workshops


Cultural Humility in the
Curriculum: Using self-reflection
to fill the gap
Runtime: 1:20:14
 

Exploring “Servingness” in
Dual Designated AANAPISIs
and HSIs in Southern Nevada
Runtime: 1:27:07
 

Inclusive Accessibility:
Designing a campus-wide accessibility
program through inclusive planning
Runtime: 1:13:20
 

The Tail of Two Robes
Runtime: 0:56:01


 

There's Not A Place For Me:
Supporting NSHE's forgotten
population of African American
male students
Runtime: 1:09:56

Will We Ever Be Heard?
Runtime: 1:15:33