Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a rich heritage thousands of years old and have both shaped the history of the United States and had their lives dramatically influenced by moments in its history. Every April, CSN celebrates and honors Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

Events

The Impact Series: Attack on Titan
April 9th | 2-3pm | MS Teams link

Attack on Titan is one of the most notable and original manga and anime to come out of Japan. Join us as we discuss the show, the genre of anime, and its impact in the second of five conversations on Asian media in global pop culture.

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage 

The Impact Series: A Sun
April 23 | 2-3pm | MS Teams link

The winner of nine film awards including Best Narrative Feature at the Golden Horse Awards, A Sun examines what it’s like to grow up under heavy expectations in a Taiwanese family. Join us as we discuss the film, award-winning cinema, and its impact in the fourth of five conversations on Asian media in global pop culture.

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage 

The Impact Series: Boys Over Flowers
April 2 | 2-3pm

Boys Over Flowers contains many of the tropes of modern Korean romantic dramas. Join us as we discuss the show, the genre of K-Dramas, and its impact in the first of five conversations

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage 

The Impact Series: PK
April 30 | 2-3pm | MS Teams link

When Aamir Khan and Rajkumar Hirani team up, comedy always ensues. PK is no exception. The story of an extraterrestrial left lost on Earth, PK explores what it means to be human. Join us as we discuss the film, Indian comedies, and their impact in the fifth of five conversations on Asian media in global pop culture.

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage 

The Impact Series: The 36th Chamber of Shaolin
April 16 | 2-3pm | MS Teams link

The 36th Chamber of Shaolin is a genre-defining film about perseverance to gain enlightenment. Join us as we discuss the film, the genre of Kung Fu, and its impact in the third of five conversations on Asian media in global pop culture.

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage

Defining and Derailing Hate Crimes
Thursday, April 29 | 3:30PM-5PM | MS Teams link

This solutions-driven discussion, with special attention to current AAPI hate crimes, I brought to you by the Social Justice League and AAPIHC.

Social Justice for All

About Identity Months & Weeks
Cartoon image of multiple people

Since the early 1900s, our nation has dedicated days, weeks, and months for specific communities to highlight, educate and celebrate their contributions to society. To foster equality, diversity, and inclusivity at CSN, we join the nation in honoring our diverse communities during the academic year by planning events for the following:

  • September 15 – October 15: Latinx Heritage Month
  • October: LGBTQ Pride Month
  • November: International Education Week
  • February: Black History Month
  • March: Native American Heritage Month
  • March: Women's Empowerment Month
  • April: Asian American, Pacific Islander Heritage Month

The Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion works collaboratively with students, departments, and committees to offer and support programs for identity months and weeks to ensure CSN educates and celebrates our nation, our campus, and ourselves. Events are open to everyone at CSN no matter how a person identifies.

Why CSN Recognizes Native American Heritage Month in March
Simple image with "Native American Heritage Month"

While the nation celebrates Native American Heritage Month in November to recognize Indigenous heritage, November is a very difficult time of year for the Native community as explained in detail below. As such, CSN honors Native American Heritage Month in the spring (March), which typically marks the beginning of pow wow season. Additionally, many Nations are traditionally matrilineal, so March would serve as a good month that will also afford exploring the intersection of Native women's issues such as the missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Halloween
To start November, we need to first recognize the end of October and the celebration of Halloween. In the United States, Halloween can be problematic for Native Americans due to the cultural appropriation caused by revelers donning mock regalia. This is doubly insulting given the history of systemic Native American dehumanization and suppression. Ancestors have lost lives and land. They were forcibly taken from their homelands and beaten for speaking their heritage languages, practicing their religion, wearing their hair long or dressing in traditional clothing. It's not just that our culture is appropriated- it's that it was also illegal for Natives to practice it themselves.

Columbus Day
Things have been getting better, but nearly every year, there is a new debate on replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous People's Day, including the racist rhetoric that accompanies the discussion. Celebrating a lost slave trader who brought disease and "discovered the New World" trivializes the government sanctioned genocide against Native Americans and contributes to their overall erasure.

Thanksgiving
Similar arguments as Columbus Day, but far more impactful. Many Natives refuse to recognize Thanksgiving instead protesting it as a "National Day of Mourning." Those that do celebrate typically justify it as an excuse to spend time with family members.

For more information, refer to these articles:

- Information prepared by Sara Quintana, CSN Native American Heritage Chair 2021

Contact Us at least 72 hours in advance if you have question, concerns, or need to request event accommodations.

CSN is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution. For more information visit www.csn.edu/nondiscrimination